A good credit repair company first pulls your credit reports from each of the three major credit bureaus in order to pinpoint your credit issues. Why all three? Because each credit reporting agency has its own “data furnishers” (aka lenders, credit card companies, debt collectors, etc.), that report your credit information to them. And there may be errors that appear on one of your credit reports, but don’t appear on the others
My Credit Group is a credit repair company staffed by credit experts, loan officers, collection agents and debt negotiators. The company has been employed by numerous organizations, including the United States of Defense and Chase Manhattan. They will develop a personalized plan to repair your credit, tailored to your credit history and needs. They can also employ debt settlement negotiation services while working on repairing your credit.
With what they charge, is Lexington Law effective at helping people improve their credit history? As you'd expect with such a large business, the reviews are mixed. Most credit repair services are criticized for not making noticeable improvements in less than two months, but that's to be expected. But, Lexington seems to have a higher-than-average number of people who say that they didn't get prompt responses from company reps, not just that their reports didn't improve quickly. On the other hand, we found numerous people saying that their credit scores improved dramatically as they stayed with the service, usually for six months on average.
"In MY experience (of course you decide for yourself), the company is great and responsive for erroneous things that really should come off and that can be taken care of in the first month with the first set of challenges. I made the mistake of letting them convince me to keep on allowing them to challenge and re-challenge the same issues, with no progress made and considerable expenditure on my part. Be aware of the other ramifications of having these "challenges" on your record that they don’t tell you about. Good luck!"
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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