"I like that you are helping me to improve my credit, even though the price is a little high but it's worth doing it for my future. I just wish it would improve a little faster and also get rid or lower the interest rate on the federal loan, hopefully I can see a better score next month or so. I do plan on getting a new car some time next year or so depending on the status of my credit."
"My credit was at an all-time low and I did not know what I was going to do. CreditRepair.com got my credit reports straightened out and I can now go on with my life being able to afford the things that make life worth enjoying again like loans for a home at a reasonable rate instead of being turned down before I even get to first base. Thank you!"
Many people don’t have the time to do their own credit repair or don’t understand how to make their case. So they look into hiring a credit repair company to dispute errors for them. These companies can charge a fee for their legwork—more on how that works below. There are times when the extra help is valuable. For example, if you have multiple errors across credit reports or you’ve been the victim of identity theft.

Editorial Policy: The information contained in Ask Experian is for educational purposes only and is not legal advice. Opinions expressed here are author's alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer or other company, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. All information, including rates and fees, are accurate as of the date of publication and are updated as provided by our partners.
The honest answer? Yes, and no. Credit repair is a great way to improve your credit score, if the problem is caused by a disputable error. If your credit score is poor because of a giant pile of debt — debt that you legitimately owe — then credit repair may not be the right solution. Determining which path to take will be based upon those considerations as well as any other factors that may be unique to your situation — and this is something only you can decide.
If you find information that is incorrect, you can file a dispute. Remember too, that items on your credit report that you don't recognize could also be potential signs of fraudulent activity — someone working to secure credit in your name for their own use. Make sure you're clear on items that could potentially be fraudulent, versus those that may simply be inaccurate.
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