If you have negative information on your credit report, it will remain there for 7-10 years. This helps lenders and others get a better picture of your credit history. However, while you may not be able to change information from the past, you can demonstrate good credit management moving forward by paying your bills on time and as agreed. As you build a positive credit history, over time, your credit scores will likely improve.
If you pay a charge-off in full, your credit report will be updated to show the account balance is $0 and the account is paid. The charge-off status will continue to be reported for seven years from the date of charge off. Another option is to settle charge-offs for less than the original balance if the creditor agrees to accept a settlement and cancel the rest of the debt.
The honest answer? Yes, and no. Credit repair is a great way to improve your credit score, if the problem is caused by a disputable error. If your credit score is poor because of a giant pile of debt — debt that you legitimately owe — then credit repair may not be the right solution. Determining which path to take will be based upon those considerations as well as any other factors that may be unique to your situation — and this is something only you can decide.
Some of your creditors and lenders might report only to one of the credit bureaus. And, since credit bureaus don’t typically share information, it’s possible to have different information on each of your reports. Ordering all three reports will give you a complete view of your credit history and let you repair your credit at all three bureaus instead of just one. 

“A good credit repair company will scrub questionable credit report items against other laws—like the Fair Credit Billing Act, which regulates original creditors; the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, which oversees collection agencies; and others that address medical illness, military service, student status and other life events,” Padawer said.

My Credit Group is a credit repair company staffed by credit experts, loan officers, collection agents and debt negotiators. The company has been employed by numerous organizations, including the United States of Defense and Chase Manhattan. They will develop a personalized plan to repair your credit, tailored to your credit history and needs. They can also employ debt settlement negotiation services while working on repairing your credit.

eCreditAttorney's pricing is simple: $29 per month. For that fee, your credit repair service should include addressing late payments, collections, bankruptcies, tax liens, repossessions, judgments, foreclosures, charge-offs, garnishment, even identity theft/fraud. You're expected to provide a current copy of your most recent, updated credit report; it's not included with the fees that you pay. Side note: the link provided by eCreditAttorney for their "preferred credit score provider" took us to an invalid page - not very encouraging.
With the elimination of downloadable credit repair software, companies found themselves with an old program in a new age world. Most credit repair software programs were made to facilitate 32-bit computers, which have now become a thing of the past. Having updated computer systems are a must when it comes to operating a successfully growing credit repair businesses, and outdated software will only inhibit and restrain your advancement.
This provider offers a "performance-based refund policy": after you've been a client in good standing for 6 months, you can request a full evaluation of any progress they've made in repairing your credit. For every improvement or deletion they've made, eCreditAttorney will count it as a $95 value. If the total of monthly fees you've paid exceeds the value of $95 per improved/deleted item, you'll get a refund of the difference. Do the math, because that's not a fantastic deal: at $29/month, eCreditAttorney would only have to make two improvements or deletions over the course of 6 months to demonstrate adequate "performance".
Brittney Mayer is a credit strategist and contributing editor for BadCredit.org, where she uses her extensive research background to write comprehensive consumer guides aimed at helping readers make educated financial decisions on the path to building better credit. Leveraging her vast knowledge of the financial industry, Brittney’s work can be found on a variety of websites, including the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, US News & World Report, NBC News,TheSimpleDollar.com, CreditRepair.com, Lexington Law, CardRates.com, and CreditCards.com, among others.
Since 1991, Lexington Law has been the trusted leader in credit repair. They offer a complimentary credit report evaluation with no obligation, including your credit score at no cost. Monthly plans start at $89.95 with no contract allowing you to cancel at any time with a 50% discount available for couples, family, household members, and active military members.
"I went and got a new car in Feb 2013 signed the contract and drove off with my new car. A few weeks later I get a call that the financing had fell through or that's what I was told so I returned the car after realizing it wasn't worth it with an interest rate at 22%. I decided to go ahead and start the process of having a house built but found out my credit score had been knocked down by 100 points so I called CreditRepair.com. I'm so happy with the outcome - I can't wait to see my results for the month of April."
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