Credit repair services: Trinity Credit Services helps clients with credit issues ranging from a quick fix to total restoration. The process begins with a free credit report evaluation. Next, they develop a customized credit repair plan. Credit repair services include filing letters to remove inaccurate information from credit reports, such as late payments, bankruptcies and other harmful information.
This provider offers a "performance-based refund policy": after you've been a client in good standing for 6 months, you can request a full evaluation of any progress they've made in repairing your credit. For every improvement or deletion they've made, eCreditAttorney will count it as a $95 value. If the total of monthly fees you've paid exceeds the value of $95 per improved/deleted item, you'll get a refund of the difference. Do the math, because that's not a fantastic deal: at $29/month, eCreditAttorney would only have to make two improvements or deletions over the course of 6 months to demonstrate adequate "performance".

We got even more confused when reading through the company's return and refund policy. It talks about returning software to Pyramid - but every description of the service says that it can all be accessed online. Why would they be shipping software to their customers - and would their customers install it with no clear explanation as to what it's used for?


Pyramid did not blow us away with the description of their services. Who do they contact to submit disputes? How quickly do they follow up? Which types of circumstances do they help with? Most of their competitors offer lengthy lists of exactly which types of disputes they draft and what to expect from the service; Pyramid's answers were vague at best.
If you find information that is incorrect, you can file a dispute. Remember too, that items on your credit report that you don't recognize could also be potential signs of fraudulent activity — someone working to secure credit in your name for their own use. Make sure you're clear on items that could potentially be fraudulent, versus those that may simply be inaccurate.
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