Yes they have military pricing for families as a courtesy. I used them before. Reliant has some kind of discount thing going as well, which is good because after they charge you and limit you, you get some $ off which is a relief. The dislikes on this are probably them or their fans. They don't seem to like competition which is understandable since they don't know how to compete anyway. Hope that helps.
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*Ranking information is based on a compilation of reviews from the following third-party review sites: Bestcompany.com, Credible.com, BadCredit.org, and TheCreditReview.com. Credit.com has examined each review on the third-party sites listed and compared those sites' findings with the individual credit repair services' websites to derive the Credit.com reviews shown here.
With what they charge, is Lexington Law effective at helping people improve their credit history? As you'd expect with such a large business, the reviews are mixed. Most credit repair services are criticized for not making noticeable improvements in less than two months, but that's to be expected. But, Lexington seems to have a higher-than-average number of people who say that they didn't get prompt responses from company reps, not just that their reports didn't improve quickly. On the other hand, we found numerous people saying that their credit scores improved dramatically as they stayed with the service, usually for six months on average.
Once you have your credit reports, read through them completely. If you have a long credit history, your credit reports might be several pages long. Try not to get overwhelmed by all the information you're reading. It's a lot to digest, especially if you're checking your credit report for the first time. Take your time and review your credit report over several days if you need to.
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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