"My credit had been bad for a while because of bad decisions. I just came to the point where I said this can be better. I heard your radio commercial and your customer service walked me through the whole process and explained and answered all my questions. I am very thank you for you helping me raise my scores to a respectful. It’s been such a journey. Thank you"
"I went and got a new car in Feb 2013 signed the contract and drove off with my new car. A few weeks later I get a call that the financing had fell through or that's what I was told so I returned the car after realizing it wasn't worth it with an interest rate at 22%. I decided to go ahead and start the process of having a house built but found out my credit score had been knocked down by 100 points so I called CreditRepair.com. I'm so happy with the outcome - I can't wait to see my results for the month of April."
I responded to the ad=SCAM On craigslist. The man that spoke with an accent told me after the sign up process they would email me a list of houses. That raised my suspicions right then and there. I should of just hung up. But when i did I could NEVER get a hold of anyone, NEVER a solid answer. Nothing but a scam. i also feel this service made my already bad credit worse. 1st i got an email saying a negative was removed then i got an email saying it was back.
After you download your credit reports, it takes several hours to review them for errors. Then, you must gather documentation and draft dispute letters, which could take up to a week or more if you aren’t already familiar with your records. Depending on the item and the reason it's in your credit history, this could involve writing a short letter or performing significant amounts of research.
If you find information that is incorrect, you can file a dispute. Remember too, that items on your credit report that you don't recognize could also be potential signs of fraudulent activity — someone working to secure credit in your name for their own use. Make sure you're clear on items that could potentially be fraudulent, versus those that may simply be inaccurate.
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