Here’s a good example of when a reputable credit repair service can help you do something you may not be able to accomplish yourself. If you have a collection account that’s been sold to a few different debt collectors, it can appear on your credit report multiple times. That information is accurate but having that one debt dinging your credit score multiple times doesn't meet the “fair” standard that Padawer mentioned.

Credit Assistance Network is one of the few credit repair providers that offers a pay-as-you-go pricing structure. You'll make an initial payment of $179 (or $279 for a couple), which gets you access to one -on-one consultations with a certified FICO professional, debt validation/goodwill letters to creditors, cease and desist letters to collection agencies, and unlimited disputes. From there, you'll be charged for every deletion CAN is able to achieve on your account - $50 for confirmed deletions per bureau, and $70 for deletions from public records. That could add up very quickly, if you have multiple issues on your credit history.
Who wouldn't love to get paid to shop, eat out, or go to the movies? That may sound too good to be true, but thousands of mystery shoppers across the US and Canada are doing just that: getting paid to visit restaurants, retail stores, and even theme parks in order to provide a customer's perspective on the cleanliness, service, and overall experience at the location.

"When you first start the program after reading the previous reviews, you hope you're not the next one to get suckered. Which is how I'm feeling right now! $89.00 a month for something that shouldn't take this long. Only small improvements in credit score and already out almost $500.00 bucks. I should have chosen a different company that can deliver faster results instead of milking my wallet month to month. They sound good on radio and in other advertisement, but the actual results don't live up to the HYPE!!!!!! It shouldn't take this long to get the maximum results."


Where is the best place to monitor your credit? In order to purchase a home, buy a car, or obtain almost any kind of loan, you need good credit and history. Falling behind on credit card payments, making too many expensive purchases, opening multiple credit card accounts, filing for bankruptcy, not paying monthly bills, and other factors may cause your credit score to drop significantly. On the flip side, staying on top of credit card payments, paying bills right away, and paying off loans are a few of the ways you can build a fantastic credit score.

The Credit Repair Organizations Act, or CROA, makes it illegal for credit repair companies to lie about their services and results, and sets some additional rules. If you think you might be the victim of a credit repair scam, or if you’ve had other issues with a credit repair company, you can submit a complaint to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.


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There are a lot of reasons that your credit may be in rough shape. Most are related to your spending habits. And, if you missed a few payments or your debt levels are too high—think over 30% of your total available credit limits—disputing errors won’t help you. You’ll have to make some changes to improve your credit scores instead. And you may have to wait a bit to see an uptick.
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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