The services provided by The Credit People are as you'd expect with a credit repair service: disputes, inquiries, interventions and validations. We like that they focus their results not just on removing negative items from your credit history, but also specifically on improving your credit score - so that you can more easily qualify for a loan or be selected as a tenant for a rental. We also appreciate that their approach to working with their clients is "How can we help?" with situations like trying to get interest rates lowered or to get a referral letter, going above and beyond the issues associated with your credit report.
Getting negative and inaccurate information off of your credit reports is one of the fastest ways to improve your score. Since credit bureaus have to respond and resolve a dispute within 30 days—a few exceptions can extend this to 45 days—it’s a short timeline. The timeline is particulary important when consumers want to buy a house, get a new car or open up a new credit card and don’t have time to wait to build good credit organically.
Digging around a little more, though, we were left with some question marks. First, several places on the site refer to a 6-month, prepaid package plan that comes with a 6-month guarantee but this isn't listed on the Pricing page. Then, we were happy to see lots of informative articles on the Credit Resource Section - but disappointed to find that the Regulations page was totally blank.

The honest answer? Yes, and no. Credit repair is a great way to improve your credit score, if the problem is caused by a disputable error. If your credit score is poor because of a giant pile of debt — debt that you legitimately owe — then credit repair may not be the right solution. Determining which path to take will be based upon those considerations as well as any other factors that may be unique to your situation — and this is something only you can decide.
“A good credit repair company will scrub questionable credit report items against other laws—like the Fair Credit Billing Act, which regulates original creditors; the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, which oversees collection agencies; and others that address medical illness, military service, student status and other life events,” Padawer said.
Editorial Note: This content is not provided or commissioned by the credit card issuer. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of the credit card issuer, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the credit card issuer. Every reasonable effort has been made to maintain accurate information, however all credit card information is presented without warranty. After you click on an offer you will be directed to the credit card issuer’s web site where you can review the terms and conditions for your offer.

"When I first started with CreditRepair.com my credit was in poor shape with a few collection accounts that I was not aware of. I was looking for a home mortgage loan and was sure it would never get it approved based on my scores, but in less than 3 months, and with the help of CreditRepair.com, almost all of the negative items were removed and I was able to get my loan. Thanks for the help."

"I had virtually had nowhere to turn as I tried to reconstruct this area of my life until I began to search the net for solutions. I spoke with a representative of CreditRepair.com and was immediately assured that this was the safest and legal approach to resolving my credit issues. What I really like is the daily update and the activity being reported."
Opening several credit accounts in a short amount of time can appear risky to lenders and negatively impact your credit score. Before you take out a loan or open a new credit card account, consider the effects it could have on your credit scores. Know too, that when you're buying a car or looking around for the best mortgage rates, your inquiries may be grouped and counted as only one inquiry for the purpose of adding information to your credit report. In many commonly-used scoring models, recent inquiries have greater effect than older inquiries, and they only appear on your credit report or a maximum of 25 months.
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