Your clients will have 24/7 access to their agreements, attachments, credit repair status, dispute history—everything they need to stay informed. Credit repair progress charts and graphs will allow your clients to view the status of their profile in an easy to understand format. No more phone calls asking “what is the status and progress”, your customers can log in and have real-time access to status and daily progress.

One major difference between the two plans Ovation offers: you'll be in charge of submitting disputes on their lower-priced package. They'll guide you through the process of determining what to send and to whom, but you'll be responsible for making it happen. If you prefer that your credit repair service submit those dispute letters on your behalf, you'll want to choose the Essentials Plus package.


Credit card consolidation - is it right for you? If you're carrying a high interest rate across multiple cards, you may benefit from such services. With more and more Americans facing large medical bills, job loss, and other financial setbacks, credit card debt is higher than ever. And, with interest rates and late fees, it's not unusual for people to get in over their heads. Credit card consolidation helps consumers to better manage their debt and get back on solid financial footing once more.
Amber Brooks is a Contributing Editor at Digital Brands. She spends her days consulting with financial experts to bring readers the best recommendations and tips on the web. She's interviewed financial leaders from all around the world. With a background in writing, she's uniquely suited to diluting complex financial jargon into terms that are easily understood. When not obsessively budgeting out her days, Amber can often be found with her nose in a book.

Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).

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