Will you get effective credit repair services from Credit Assistance Network? Their reputation is puzzling. On the one hand, they've been in the industry for more than 10 years and have only positive reviews on the Better Business Bureau website - and yet, their rating with the BBB is only a mediocre "C+". We also felt misled by the CAN website, which said that their rating was a flawless "A+". Can you trust a company to repair your credit if, from the very start, they're not fully honest with their own reputation?
For the most part, Credit Saint's reputation is good: accreditation and an "A+" rating with the Better Business Bureau is strong evidence that they're helping people repair their credit in a way that is trustworthy and effective. There are also almost no negative reviews registered at the BBB for this company, which is impressive for a business that has been around for over 14 years. We found a few reviews that expressed frustration with Credit Saint's higher-than-average fees for credit repair services, but the company is very transparent with what you'll pay. We would like to see a clearer explanation of all of their services, particularly the "dispute avalanche".
If you get denied for a major credit card, try applying for a retail store credit card. They have a reputation for approving applicants with bad or limited credit history. Still no luck? Consider getting a secured credit card which requires you to make a security deposit to get a credit limit. In some ways, a secured credit card is more useful than a retail credit card because it can be used in more places. Certain subprime credit cards are geared toward helping customers who wish to rebuild their credit; however, make sure you choose legitimate offers and compare the fees and interest rates before applying.

Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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