When considering the fees, it’s important to weigh what you’re getting in return. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), credit repair firms can’t legally do anything for you that you can’t do for yourself. You just have to be willing to spend the time reviewing your credit reports for negative or inaccurate information, reaching out to the credit bureaus to dispute that information, and following up on those disputes to make sure they’re being investigated.
To get the inaccurate marks off your credit history, you must request that the credit bureaus validate the information that you believe is inaccurate. Credit repair strategies also include sending cease-and-desist letters to debt collectors. Removing just a single negative item on your credit report can increase your credit score by more than 100 points.

"I worked with a different credit repair provider approximately 10 years ago. The experience then compared to my experience now with CreditRepair.com is completely different. I am a "skeptic" and do not trust credit repair businesses easily. The representatives are professional (always) and I have the opportunity to get text and email updates on every transaction that is performed on my behalf to improve my credit score. There is nothing I can think of that is not already being done that could improve the service."
This provider offers a "performance-based refund policy": after you've been a client in good standing for 6 months, you can request a full evaluation of any progress they've made in repairing your credit. For every improvement or deletion they've made, eCreditAttorney will count it as a $95 value. If the total of monthly fees you've paid exceeds the value of $95 per improved/deleted item, you'll get a refund of the difference. Do the math, because that's not a fantastic deal: at $29/month, eCreditAttorney would only have to make two improvements or deletions over the course of 6 months to demonstrate adequate "performance".

In order to analyze credit files, identify credit reporting errors, and evaluate credit scoring, credit repair advisors must be highly trained and have some level of experience. To understand the credit scoring models and how they differ from each other, one can review the most popular credit scoring model, FICO. Known as Fair Isaac and Company, FICO can help you understand the complexities of credit scoring and the credit scoring process, including identifying potential inaccuracies, duplications, merged files, unverifiable data, and outdated data.
"Since I reached adult hood my credit has been poor due to having a serious medical condition and being raised in a struggling family without proper medical insurance. Even though I've worked hard my whole life I could never get a handle on my credit situation and never had the opportunity to prove my credit worthiness. Desperate to have good credit I've been taken by scams promising to clean my credit up and after thousands of dollars I've seen no change. Reluctantly I allowed CreditRepair.com to help me with their promise to clean my credit up and they are doing just that! In just a couple months they've proven they stand by their word! My credit score has jumped from the very weak 400's to 620 and they're not done yet! Finally I can see the light at the end of the tunnel! Thank you, CreditRepair.com!"
Can you count on Credit Repair Consultants to deliver? Probably not. According to the BBB, they requested documentation from the service in 2013 and 2014, to show that they were in compliance with the FTC's standards for credit repair. As of our review, the BBB still hadn't received it. We also saw that it took the company more than 6 months to respond to a customer complaint online, and that the most recent articles in the "Credit Repair News" section of the website was from nearly two years prior to our review.

Lenders and others usually use your credit report along with additional finance factors to make decisions about the risks they face in lending to you. Having negative information on your credit report or a low credit score could suggest to lenders that you are less likely to pay back your debt as agreed. As a result, they may deny you a loan or charge you higher rates and fees.
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