You have the right to dispute any information in your credit report that's inaccurate, incomplete, or you believe can't be verified. When you order your credit report, you'll receive instructions on how to dispute credit report information. Credit reports ordered online typically come with instructions for making disputes online, but you can also make disputes over the phone and through the mail.
"My credit was at an all-time low and I did not know what I was going to do. CreditRepair.com got my credit reports straightened out and I can now go on with my life being able to afford the things that make life worth enjoying again like loans for a home at a reasonable rate instead of being turned down before I even get to first base. Thank you!"
After you download your credit reports, it takes several hours to review them for errors. Then, you must gather documentation and draft dispute letters, which could take up to a week or more if you aren’t already familiar with your records. Depending on the item and the reason it's in your credit history, this could involve writing a short letter or performing significant amounts of research.
Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from third party companies ("our partners") from which Experian Consumer Services receives compensation, however, the compensation does not impact how or where the products appear on this site. The offers on the site do not represent all available financial services, companies, or products.
Scoring models consider how much you owe and across how many different accounts. If you have debt across a large number of accounts, it may be beneficial to pay off some of the accounts, if you can. Paying down your debt is the goal of many who've accrued debt in the past, but even after you pay the balance down to zero, consider keeping that account open. Keeping paid-off accounts open can be a plus in your overall credit mix since they're aged accounts in good (paid-off) standing. You may also consider debt consolidation.
×