"I'm very happy with my results, and I'm a new member. I have seen results with my first month with CreditRepair.com. I'm very pleased with the customer service, they are friendly, and they make sure I understand the steps, and how important it is to have good credit. I want to thank you for your service, and assisting me with questions and concerns."
They lie about their rating on the BBB they have an F. They charge an initiation fee, but its against the Credit Repair Organization Act to charge in advanced for work not yet done. They wont start your work until you pay this fee, so there is no way of avoiding paying ahead for services not yet rendered. They rush through my contract, I had no idea about an ending balance. They will charge a months fee at the end to cancel services. Beware of this company, for the services they do, the cost is not worth it. If you ask them to remove your payment method they will say no and offer no guarantee of no future charges. The customer service will curse at you on the phone, get irate, hang up, if you ask for a refund. I wish I did more research before contacting this this company. I wish I could get my money back.
If you have negative information on your credit report, it will remain there for 7-10 years. This helps lenders and others get a better picture of your credit history. However, while you may not be able to change information from the past, you can demonstrate good credit management moving forward by paying your bills on time and as agreed. As you build a positive credit history, over time, your credit scores will likely improve.
Yes they have military pricing for families as a courtesy. I used them before. Reliant has some kind of discount thing going as well, which is good because after they charge you and limit you, you get some $ off which is a relief. The dislikes on this are probably them or their fans. They don't seem to like competition which is understandable since they don't know how to compete anyway. Hope that helps.
They may be willing to waive some of the late penalties or spread the past due balance over few payments. Let them know you're anxious to avoid charge-off, but need some help. Your creditor may even be willing to re-age your account to show your payments as current rather than delinquent, but you'll have to actually talk to your creditors to negotiate.
"I just want to say how great it is working with CreditRepair.com and how much hope you guys have given me. You have made great strides in just a few short months and I am sure to reach my goal before this year is over. Whenever I call, and I call a lot, you are never too busy to talk to me and I knew from the very first interview that you truly care about your customers. With all my heart I am truly grateful."
I have 1 negative item, and its just a really simple negative item that they haven't been able to remove in 6 months now. Theyre just sitting there collecting their monthly subscription money from me and not doing a thing. Couldve just payed the $300 debt off and had it removed already and would have cost me 10x less then I've paid to credit repair!! Ridiculous!!!!
Unfortunately, when your credit history is less than fantastic - because of making payments after the due date, having too many credit inquiries, or even having mistaken information associated with your identity - you'll have fewer options when you need to make a major purchase. You may even have to pay higher than average rates on your car insurance or your mortgage.

Your loan balances also affect your credit score in a similar way. The credit score calculation compares your loan current loan balance to the original loan amount. The closer your loan balances are to the original amount you borrowed, the more it hurts your credit score. Focus first on paying down credit card balances because they have more impact on your credit score.

Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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