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Credit repair services: Credit repair services to help dispute and remove collections, late payments, bankruptcies, repossessions, duplicated accounts, junk debt buyers, short sale and foreclosures, incorrect personal info, inflated/expired debts, outdated information, judgments and charge-offs. In addition to credit repair services, Credit Assistance Network offers identity theft resolution and public records disputes.

You can also get your free Experian credit score and a credit report card that are updated every 14 days on Credit.com. Your credit report card shows where you stand in the five key areas that make up your score—payment history, credit utilization, account mix, credit age and inquiries. Your report card also gives you tips on how to improve your standing in each area if needed. And checking your report card and score doesn’t hurt your credit in any way.
Many people don’t have the time to do their own credit repair or don’t understand how to make their case. So they look into hiring a credit repair company to dispute errors for them. These companies can charge a fee for their legwork—more on how that works below. There are times when the extra help is valuable. For example, if you have multiple errors across credit reports or you’ve been the victim of identity theft.
Amber Brooks is a Contributing Editor at Digital Brands. She spends her days consulting with financial experts to bring readers the best recommendations and tips on the web. She's interviewed financial leaders from all around the world. With a background in writing, she's uniquely suited to diluting complex financial jargon into terms that are easily understood. When not obsessively budgeting out her days, Amber can often be found with her nose in a book.
If you find information that is incorrect, you can file a dispute. Remember too, that items on your credit report that you don't recognize could also be potential signs of fraudulent activity — someone working to secure credit in your name for their own use. Make sure you're clear on items that could potentially be fraudulent, versus those that may simply be inaccurate.
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