Advancements in technology make it much less difficult for credit repair businesses to quickly start operating a successful credit repair business. The latest software that people use in this industry is all “cloud-based,” and automates most credit repair related tasks. Thus, you can spend more time marketing and serving your customers. Also, an easy to use customer management screen will make it easy to find any customer’s credit repair history in one place.
With the elimination of downloadable credit repair software, companies found themselves with an old program in a new age world. Most credit repair software programs were made to facilitate 32-bit computers, which have now become a thing of the past. Having updated computer systems are a must when it comes to operating a successfully growing credit repair businesses, and outdated software will only inhibit and restrain your advancement.
Here’s a good example of when a reputable credit repair service can help you do something you may not be able to accomplish yourself. If you have a collection account that’s been sold to a few different debt collectors, it can appear on your credit report multiple times. That information is accurate but having that one debt dinging your credit score multiple times doesn't meet the “fair” standard that Padawer mentioned.
Credit repair is critical to saving money on insurance, loans, and credit cards, but that's not the only reason to repair your credit. A better credit score opens up new employment opportunities, even promotions and raises with your current employer. If you dream of starting your own business or just want the security of knowing you can borrow money when you want to, you should repair your credit sooner rather than later.

The Credit Repair Organizations Act, or CROA, makes it illegal for credit repair companies to lie about their services and results, and sets some additional rules. If you think you might be the victim of a credit repair scam, or if you’ve had other issues with a credit repair company, you can submit a complaint to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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