Disclaimer: TurboDispute has no affiliation with the credit bureaus. TurboDispute LLC is not a Credit Repair Organization and does not provide credit repair services or financial or legal advice. TurboDispute’s intended use is to help you automate the time-consuming process of creating dispute letters to help you communicate with credit bureaus, original creditors, collection agencies, chexsystems, telecheck and provide you with educational materials. You may use the software to challenge credit items identified as inaccurate, misleading, or unverifiable, but no consumer has the right to have accurate, current, and verifiable information removed from a Credit Report. Further, you must make sure that you do not send any dispute letter or form, which contains any untrue statement of fact about your customer’s situation. This product provides certain information about the law. But legal information is not the same as legal advice -- the application of law to an individual's specific circumstances. We recommend you consult a lawyer if you want legal advice applicable to your situation or how the Software and this information may apply to you.
"It has been 4 weeks since the day I registered. I have also registered with Equifax Credit Bureau directly which increased my credit score twice as much as credit repair did not even change the info in their website. Every time I call them they tell me they have sent the requests. It will take months to reflect on your credit. Little different then what I originally expected. I am still registered."

Either way, you should always remove any errors or outdated information from your credit report — regardless of the actual effect on your score — as soon as you discover them. A clean credit report can give you peace of mind the next time you apply for a loan; you’ll know that an inaccurate credit score isn’t holding you back from qualifying for a better interest rate, saving you time and money in the long run.

When considering the fees, it’s important to weigh what you’re getting in return. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), credit repair firms can’t legally do anything for you that you can’t do for yourself. You just have to be willing to spend the time reviewing your credit reports for negative or inaccurate information, reaching out to the credit bureaus to dispute that information, and following up on those disputes to make sure they’re being investigated.
And with ecommerce transactions becoming more and more common right along with significant data breaches, identity theft rates are only increasing. The number of documented data breaches increased from 614 in 2013 to 1,579 in 2017. Whatever the source, mistakes in a credit report can have devastating effects on a consumer’s ability to access credit.
From there, Credit Repair's experts work with credit companies to implement your plan, and then they verify with the credit bureaus to make sure that those changes actually take effect. You can track your progress through your personal online dashboard and a mobile app, where you'll also see your score tracker and analysis of the changes to your credit profile.
Disclaimer: Crediful does its best to maintain accurate and updated information. However, our web content may be different than the information you receive from a financial institution or service provider. We do not offer warranties for any products and services linked from this site. Before choosing any financial product, read all information, including terms and conditions from the financial service provider. Finally, the site may receive compensation from third-party advertisers. All content is written objectively and meant to provide a neutral opinion.
Opening several credit accounts in a short amount of time can appear risky to lenders and negatively impact your credit score. Before you take out a loan or open a new credit card account, consider the effects it could have on your credit scores. Know too, that when you're buying a car or looking around for the best mortgage rates, your inquiries may be grouped and counted as only one inquiry for the purpose of adding information to your credit report. In many commonly-used scoring models, recent inquiries have greater effect than older inquiries, and they only appear on your credit report or a maximum of 25 months.
×