Where is the best place to monitor your credit? In order to purchase a home, buy a car, or obtain almost any kind of loan, you need good credit and history. Falling behind on credit card payments, making too many expensive purchases, opening multiple credit card accounts, filing for bankruptcy, not paying monthly bills, and other factors may cause your credit score to drop significantly. On the flip side, staying on top of credit card payments, paying bills right away, and paying off loans are a few of the ways you can build a fantastic credit score.

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I responded to the ad=SCAM On craigslist. The man that spoke with an accent told me after the sign up process they would email me a list of houses. That raised my suspicions right then and there. I should of just hung up. But when i did I could NEVER get a hold of anyone, NEVER a solid answer. Nothing but a scam. i also feel this service made my already bad credit worse. 1st i got an email saying a negative was removed then i got an email saying it was back.
Either way, you should always remove any errors or outdated information from your credit report — regardless of the actual effect on your score — as soon as you discover them. A clean credit report can give you peace of mind the next time you apply for a loan; you’ll know that an inaccurate credit score isn’t holding you back from qualifying for a better interest rate, saving you time and money in the long run.
Unfortunately, Credit Repair has lost some credibility within the industry. Why? According to the Better Business Bureau, the company was asked to prove their claims that the average customer sees progress every month while using their services - even seeing improvements in the neighborhood of 7% of questionable credit report negatives being taken off their credit reports every 30 days. As of the date of our review, the BBB was still reporting that they had not received proof of those advertising claims. Those claims are still prominently featured on the Credit Repair website.
If you have negative information on your credit report, it will remain there for 7-10 years. This helps lenders and others get a better picture of your credit history. However, while you may not be able to change information from the past, you can demonstrate good credit management moving forward by paying your bills on time and as agreed. As you build a positive credit history, over time, your credit scores will likely improve.
What you don’t deserve is to be penalized for years and years because of financial mistakes made in the past. Your credit doesn’t have to hold you back forever, and the debt that comes along with those mistakes doesn’t have to be scary and stressful. Every month we help thousands of clients get their credit repaired so they can get the job, car, house, loans, and credit cards they need to get on with their life.
"I started CreditRepair.com a couple of months ago and since then my credit score has gone up. I love this service and how they take off the negative items on my report. I would recommend this service if you are looking to repair your credit and get the bad things off your report!! When I get finished with mine my boyfriend is going to sign up and we are going to work on repairing his and taking off any negatives he may have. He too is excited to get his started after seeing the results from mine!!"
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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