From there, Credit Repair's experts work with credit companies to implement your plan, and then they verify with the credit bureaus to make sure that those changes actually take effect. You can track your progress through your personal online dashboard and a mobile app, where you'll also see your score tracker and analysis of the changes to your credit profile.
Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), credit bureaus have 30 to 45 days to investigate a disputed claim. If they can’t verify it within that time, they must remove the entry. For example, if you file a dispute with a credit bureau over a late payment and your creditor can’t verify the information, the bureau must remove that late payment from your credit report. For payments less than 90 days late, you can request a goodwill adjustment from your creditor and set up payments to prevent further damage to your credit history.
© 2019. All Rights Reserved | Legal disclaimer: The information contained on this site and our guides are for educational and informational purposes only. It does not constitute legal advice, nor does it substitute for legal advice. Persons seeking legal advice should consult with legal counsel familiar with their particular situation as consumer credit laws vary by state.
eCreditAttorney has a rock-bottom rating with the Better Business Bureau: F. According to the BBB, the provider has failed to respond to numerous customer complaints in the past three years. Customers describe getting no response from anyone at the company, even after multiple emails and phone calls, and worse - no progress on improving their credit reports after months of paying fees. Why would anyone entrust their credit repair to a company that can't even do a minimal job of keeping their customers - and the BBB - satisfied? You'll have a more positive experience with another service.
When the bureaus and data furnishers receive the dispute and supporting information, they then work with the credit repair company to determine if the item should be removed from your credit report. The major law governing your rights when it comes to credit reporting is the Fair Credit Reporting Act, but it isn’t the only law on your side when it comes to credit repair.
"I like that some things are coming off but I don't like the fact that sometimes only one negative item is being challenged at a time. I also don't like that some of the things that are being disputed are not showing as being challenged and show as pending and the rep can't explain why or fix it. I will do this only for a few more months and see if anything changes. I have several family and friends waiting for my feedback before using this service so we will see how it goes."
You're also entitled to a free credit report if you've been turned down for credit because of something on your credit report, if you're currently receiving government assistance, if you're unemployed and plan to look for a job soon, or if you think you've been a victim of credit card fraud or identity theft. Some states even have laws that let you get an additional free credit report each year. All these free credit reports should be ordered directly through the credit bureaus.
If you find information that is incorrect, you can file a dispute. Remember too, that items on your credit report that you don't recognize could also be potential signs of fraudulent activity — someone working to secure credit in your name for their own use. Make sure you're clear on items that could potentially be fraudulent, versus those that may simply be inaccurate.
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