If you'd like to get a feel for what to expect from The Credit Pros, you can get a free credit score and summary, along with an action plan, by entering your name, number, and email address. You'll then be contacted for your free initial consultation. We found some customers who described that experience as frustrating, with representatives who spoke too fast and didn't take the time to answer questions - but since it's free, there's no risk for you to give it a try for yourself.
"When I first started with CreditRepair.com my credit was in poor shape with a few collection accounts that I was not aware of. I was looking for a home mortgage loan and was sure it would never get it approved based on my scores, but in less than 3 months, and with the help of CreditRepair.com, almost all of the negative items were removed and I was able to get my loan. Thanks for the help."
"In MY experience (of course you decide for yourself), the company is great and responsive for erroneous things that really should come off and that can be taken care of in the first month with the first set of challenges. I made the mistake of letting them convince me to keep on allowing them to challenge and re-challenge the same issues, with no progress made and considerable expenditure on my part. Be aware of the other ramifications of having these "challenges" on your record that they don’t tell you about. Good luck!"
This provider offers a "performance-based refund policy": after you've been a client in good standing for 6 months, you can request a full evaluation of any progress they've made in repairing your credit. For every improvement or deletion they've made, eCreditAttorney will count it as a $95 value. If the total of monthly fees you've paid exceeds the value of $95 per improved/deleted item, you'll get a refund of the difference. Do the math, because that's not a fantastic deal: at $29/month, eCreditAttorney would only have to make two improvements or deletions over the course of 6 months to demonstrate adequate "performance".
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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