If you are thinking of starting your own credit repair business, there are many factors to take into consideration before joining the growing industry of credit repair. With the economy rates as low as they are, the need for credit repair advisors and credit repair businesses are growing quickly. Begin by first researching all of the numerous state and federal laws in accordance to starting a credit repair business. Become acquainted with the CROA (Credit Repair Organizations Act), as well as your state’s legislation, licensing and bonding laws regarding credit repair business operation. Finally, educate yourself on all credit related topics that will help you succeed in the credit repair industry.
Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), credit bureaus have 30 to 45 days to investigate a disputed claim. If they can’t verify it within that time, they must remove the entry. For example, if you file a dispute with a credit bureau over a late payment and your creditor can’t verify the information, the bureau must remove that late payment from your credit report. For payments less than 90 days late, you can request a goodwill adjustment from your creditor and set up payments to prevent further damage to your credit history.
Unfortunately, Credit Repair has lost some credibility within the industry. Why? According to the Better Business Bureau, the company was asked to prove their claims that the average customer sees progress every month while using their services - even seeing improvements in the neighborhood of 7% of questionable credit report negatives being taken off their credit reports every 30 days. As of the date of our review, the BBB was still reporting that they had not received proof of those advertising claims. Those claims are still prominently featured on the Credit Repair website.

If you find information that is incorrect, you can file a dispute. Remember too, that items on your credit report that you don't recognize could also be potential signs of fraudulent activity — someone working to secure credit in your name for their own use. Make sure you're clear on items that could potentially be fraudulent, versus those that may simply be inaccurate.
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