When shopping around for the perfect credit repair company, start with the basics: fees and reputation. As in any market, the price of credit repair services will vary by company and features. Checking the company’s reputation with the BBB and industry associations is a good way to determine their legitimacy, and ensure you’re not about to throw your money away.
"When you first start the program after reading the previous reviews, you hope you're not the next one to get suckered. Which is how I'm feeling right now! $89.00 a month for something that shouldn't take this long. Only small improvements in credit score and already out almost $500.00 bucks. I should have chosen a different company that can deliver faster results instead of milking my wallet month to month. They sound good on radio and in other advertisement, but the actual results don't live up to the HYPE!!!!!! It shouldn't take this long to get the maximum results."
Here’s a good example of when a reputable credit repair service can help you do something you may not be able to accomplish yourself. If you have a collection account that’s been sold to a few different debt collectors, it can appear on your credit report multiple times. That information is accurate but having that one debt dinging your credit score multiple times doesn't meet the “fair” standard that Padawer mentioned.
How much you spend on credit repair depends on how involved you want to be in the process. If you hire a credit repair company, expect to pay a setup fee of up to $100 and monthly service fees of up to $150 for as long as six months. If you invest the time to repair your credit on your own, the credit repair process is free. Credit repair software that costs between $30 and $400 can help you draft letters to creditors and credit bureaus.
Credit bureaus must send a notice of any corrections made to your report. Sometimes, a deleted dispute can reappear on your credit reports if the lender proves its claim is valid. If you find a derogatory mark reinserted on your credit reports, you can dispute it again. If you believe a credit reporting agency or one of your creditors has violated the FCRA, you should submit a consumer complaint to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
Of course, if keeping accounts open and having credit available could trigger additional spending and debt, it might be more beneficial to close the accounts. Only you know all the ins and outs of your financial situation, and like thumbprints, they're different for each person. Make sure you carefully evaluate your situation; only you know what can work best for your financial outlook.
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