"My credit was at an all-time low and I did not know what I was going to do. CreditRepair.com got my credit reports straightened out and I can now go on with my life being able to afford the things that make life worth enjoying again like loans for a home at a reasonable rate instead of being turned down before I even get to first base. Thank you!"
How much you spend on credit repair depends on how involved you want to be in the process. If you hire a credit repair company, expect to pay a setup fee of up to $100 and monthly service fees of up to $150 for as long as six months. If you invest the time to repair your credit on your own, the credit repair process is free. Credit repair software that costs between $30 and $400 can help you draft letters to creditors and credit bureaus.
The credit bureau usually has 30 days after receiving your dispute to investigate and verify information. Typically, the credit bureau will reach out to the company that provided the information and ask them to investigate. The credit bureau is required to send you the results of the investigation within five business days of the completion of the investigation.
"My credit was at an all-time low and I did not know what I was going to do. CreditRepair.com got my credit reports straightened out and I can now go on with my life being able to afford the things that make life worth enjoying again like loans for a home at a reasonable rate instead of being turned down before I even get to first base. Thank you!"
Many people don’t have the time to do their own credit repair or don’t understand how to make their case. So they look into hiring a credit repair company to dispute errors for them. These companies can charge a fee for their legwork—more on how that works below. There are times when the extra help is valuable. For example, if you have multiple errors across credit reports or you’ve been the victim of identity theft.
If you find information that is incorrect, you can file a dispute. Remember too, that items on your credit report that you don't recognize could also be potential signs of fraudulent activity — someone working to secure credit in your name for their own use. Make sure you're clear on items that could potentially be fraudulent, versus those that may simply be inaccurate.
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