"Without a doubt I was at the end of my rope and profoundly desperate to turn my credit score around. I was tempted to consult with individuals who were promising and guaranteeing quick results for an astronomical fee. After speaking with a CreditRepair.com representative, I felt comfortable and was willing to give them the opportunity to assist me and I have been exceptionally satisfied with their service."
Once you have your credit reports, read through them completely. If you have a long credit history, your credit reports might be several pages long. Try not to get overwhelmed by all the information you're reading. It's a lot to digest, especially if you're checking your credit report for the first time. Take your time and review your credit report over several days if you need to.

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From there, Credit Repair's experts work with credit companies to implement your plan, and then they verify with the credit bureaus to make sure that those changes actually take effect. You can track your progress through your personal online dashboard and a mobile app, where you'll also see your score tracker and analysis of the changes to your credit profile.

The honest answer? Yes, and no. Credit repair is a great way to improve your credit score, if the problem is caused by a disputable error. If your credit score is poor because of a giant pile of debt — debt that you legitimately owe — then credit repair may not be the right solution. Determining which path to take will be based upon those considerations as well as any other factors that may be unique to your situation — and this is something only you can decide.
Opening several credit accounts in a short amount of time can appear risky to lenders and negatively impact your credit score. Before you take out a loan or open a new credit card account, consider the effects it could have on your credit scores. Know too, that when you're buying a car or looking around for the best mortgage rates, your inquiries may be grouped and counted as only one inquiry for the purpose of adding information to your credit report. In many commonly-used scoring models, recent inquiries have greater effect than older inquiries, and they only appear on your credit report or a maximum of 25 months.
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