Debt Relief is more important now than ever before. Across the country, millions of people are finding it more and more difficult to meet their financial obligations. As mortgage interest rates rise, Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) payments skyrocket. Credit card late fees continue to climb higher. Lenders keep offering credit to people who are in desperate need of help, but this only prolongs the problem, and often ends up simply increasing the total debt owed by a person.

Opening several credit accounts in a short amount of time can appear risky to lenders and negatively impact your credit score. Before you take out a loan or open a new credit card account, consider the effects it could have on your credit scores. Know too, that when you're buying a car or looking around for the best mortgage rates, your inquiries may be grouped and counted as only one inquiry for the purpose of adding information to your credit report. In many commonly-used scoring models, recent inquiries have greater effect than older inquiries, and they only appear on your credit report or a maximum of 25 months.
Brittney Mayer is a credit strategist and contributing editor for BadCredit.org, where she uses her extensive research background to write comprehensive consumer guides aimed at helping readers make educated financial decisions on the path to building better credit. Leveraging her vast knowledge of the financial industry, Brittney’s work can be found on a variety of websites, including the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, US News & World Report, NBC News,TheSimpleDollar.com, CreditRepair.com, Lexington Law, CardRates.com, and CreditCards.com, among others.
If you are thinking of starting your own credit repair business, there are many factors to take into consideration before joining the growing industry of credit repair. With the economy rates as low as they are, the need for credit repair advisors and credit repair businesses are growing quickly. Begin by first researching all of the numerous state and federal laws in accordance to starting a credit repair business. Become acquainted with the CROA (Credit Repair Organizations Act), as well as your state’s legislation, licensing and bonding laws regarding credit repair business operation. Finally, educate yourself on all credit related topics that will help you succeed in the credit repair industry.
"I worked with a different credit repair provider approximately 10 years ago. The experience then compared to my experience now with CreditRepair.com is completely different. I am a "skeptic" and do not trust credit repair businesses easily. The representatives are professional (always) and I have the opportunity to get text and email updates on every transaction that is performed on my behalf to improve my credit score. There is nothing I can think of that is not already being done that could improve the service."
"This company is amazing! They are nowhere near like other companies who claim to clean your credit and all they do is take your money and run! They are very professional and show interest in their customers. I have seen major changes in my credit report in these last 5 months and am very excited to see how my report will look by the time a year hits! I would recommend them to anyone and everyone who is struggling with credit issues. I can’t wait to be able to purchase my new home! Keep up the excellent work!"
"In MY experience (of course you decide for yourself), the company is great and responsive for erroneous things that really should come off and that can be taken care of in the first month with the first set of challenges. I made the mistake of letting them convince me to keep on allowing them to challenge and re-challenge the same issues, with no progress made and considerable expenditure on my part. Be aware of the other ramifications of having these "challenges" on your record that they don’t tell you about. Good luck!"
A credit repair company initiates credit challenges to bureaus when they notice errors in your credit reports. Credit report disputes involve challenging credit bureaus, drafting goodwill letters to remove late payments and contacting data furnishers to verify old debts. Credit repair specialists review the results and, if necessary, escalate the dispute process.

Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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