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They may be willing to waive some of the late penalties or spread the past due balance over few payments. Let them know you're anxious to avoid charge-off, but need some help. Your creditor may even be willing to re-age your account to show your payments as current rather than delinquent, but you'll have to actually talk to your creditors to negotiate.
"CreditRepair.com does a wonderful job on following through with promised tasks. I have been with CreditRepair.com for less than 3 months and have received better results than I have with any other credit repair services. The service representatives are well trained in customer service and it shows through their abilities to be patient and in answering questions thoroughly. Thank You!"
Credit repair companies typically charge a one-time setup fee between $15 and $100 plus monthly fees between $60 and $150. Many companies offer a discount for couples who both need affordable credit repair services. Some credit restoration companies charge per successfully deleted item, and others charge a flat-rate fee for a specific term, usually six months. Keep in mind that legitimate credit repair companies won’t request service payments until they do some work for you.
The credit bureau usually has 30 days after receiving your dispute to investigate and verify information. Typically, the credit bureau will reach out to the company that provided the information and ask them to investigate. The credit bureau is required to send you the results of the investigation within five business days of the completion of the investigation.
How much you spend on credit repair depends on how involved you want to be in the process. If you hire a credit repair company, expect to pay a setup fee of up to $100 and monthly service fees of up to $150 for as long as six months. If you invest the time to repair your credit on your own, the credit repair process is free. Credit repair software that costs between $30 and $400 can help you draft letters to creditors and credit bureaus.

"I trust CreditRepair.com and I stand by them with everything I have. I have not been disappointed and I believe that they work each case/customer with the professionalism and knowledge of getting the job done. I recommend CreditRepair.com to anyone who needs fast and great results with all seriousness. Thank you CreditRepair.com, I owe you so much more with what you have done so far."
With what they charge, is Lexington Law effective at helping people improve their credit history? As you'd expect with such a large business, the reviews are mixed. Most credit repair services are criticized for not making noticeable improvements in less than two months, but that's to be expected. But, Lexington seems to have a higher-than-average number of people who say that they didn't get prompt responses from company reps, not just that their reports didn't improve quickly. On the other hand, we found numerous people saying that their credit scores improved dramatically as they stayed with the service, usually for six months on average.
"My experience with CreditRepair.com has been good and effective, considering the bad situation of my credit. What they advertise they will do is true. So far, I'm satisfied. In past years I've worked on credit repair and know how tedious it is & how tenacious you must be. Now, it is almost impossible to keep up with. They changed the rules. CreditRepair.com has taken all that 'work' on and so far, has been worth it."
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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