"My experience with CreditRepair.com has been good and effective, considering the bad situation of my credit. What they advertise they will do is true. So far, I'm satisfied. In past years I've worked on credit repair and know how tedious it is & how tenacious you must be. Now, it is almost impossible to keep up with. They changed the rules. CreditRepair.com has taken all that 'work' on and so far, has been worth it."
You'll probably have a limited amount of money to put toward credit repair each month. So, you'll have to prioritize where you spend your money. Focus first on accounts that are in danger of becoming past due. Get as many of these accounts current as possible, preferably all of them. Then, work on bringing down your credit card balances. Third are those accounts that have already been charged-off or sent to a collection agency.
If you'd like to get a feel for what to expect from The Credit Pros, you can get a free credit score and summary, along with an action plan, by entering your name, number, and email address. You'll then be contacted for your free initial consultation. We found some customers who described that experience as frustrating, with representatives who spoke too fast and didn't take the time to answer questions - but since it's free, there's no risk for you to give it a try for yourself.
Credit Repair Consultants also proudly proclaims that they offer a refund policy on your monthly fees. The catch? You have to be a customer for a full 12 months before you can request an evaluation of your account; if the service has successfully removed or improved your account, you may not get a refund at all. They will claim a credit of $60 for every deleted or improved item on your credit report, and then compare it to the fees you've paid. In other words, if you've paid for 12 months at nearly $60 and they've removed or improved 12 things on your credit report, you're not entitled to anything back.

Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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