Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), credit bureaus have 30 to 45 days to investigate a disputed claim. If they can’t verify it within that time, they must remove the entry. For example, if you file a dispute with a credit bureau over a late payment and your creditor can’t verify the information, the bureau must remove that late payment from your credit report. For payments less than 90 days late, you can request a goodwill adjustment from your creditor and set up payments to prevent further damage to your credit history.
If you have negative information on your credit report, it will remain there for 7-10 years. This helps lenders and others get a better picture of your credit history. However, while you may not be able to change information from the past, you can demonstrate good credit management moving forward by paying your bills on time and as agreed. As you build a positive credit history, over time, your credit scores will likely improve.
"My credit score was 553 (poor) in September 2013. I had given up. I decided to try CreditRepair.com after hearing about it on the radio. The service is so awesome; the App is awesome. They began to systematically remove negative items from my credit report and challenge others. By December 2013 my credit score had risen over 100 points to 655 (good). I am so psyched about this and can’t wait to see what my score looks like over the next two to three months. I’m telling everyone about CreditRepair.com."
**Testimonials shown are real experiences from paying users of Credit Repair Cloud. Their results are not typical and your experience will vary based upon your effort, education, business model, and market forces beyond our control. Please note that Credit Repair Cloud is not a business opportunity. Credit Repair Cloud is a software platform that helps business to operate a credit repair business. We make no earnings claims or return on investment claims, and you may not make your money back.**
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Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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