You can also get your free Experian credit score and a credit report card that are updated every 14 days on Credit.com. Your credit report card shows where you stand in the five key areas that make up your score—payment history, credit utilization, account mix, credit age and inquiries. Your report card also gives you tips on how to improve your standing in each area if needed. And checking your report card and score doesn’t hurt your credit in any way.
Disclaimer: Crediful does its best to maintain accurate and updated information. However, our web content may be different than the information you receive from a financial institution or service provider. We do not offer warranties for any products and services linked from this site. Before choosing any financial product, read all information, including terms and conditions from the financial service provider. Finally, the site may receive compensation from third-party advertisers. All content is written objectively and meant to provide a neutral opinion.

You can also get your free Experian credit score and a credit report card that are updated every 14 days on Credit.com. Your credit report card shows where you stand in the five key areas that make up your score—payment history, credit utilization, account mix, credit age and inquiries. Your report card also gives you tips on how to improve your standing in each area if needed. And checking your report card and score doesn’t hurt your credit in any way.
How much you spend on credit repair depends on how involved you want to be in the process. If you hire a credit repair company, expect to pay a setup fee of up to $100 and monthly service fees of up to $150 for as long as six months. If you invest the time to repair your credit on your own, the credit repair process is free. Credit repair software that costs between $30 and $400 can help you draft letters to creditors and credit bureaus.
This provider offers a "performance-based refund policy": after you've been a client in good standing for 6 months, you can request a full evaluation of any progress they've made in repairing your credit. For every improvement or deletion they've made, eCreditAttorney will count it as a $95 value. If the total of monthly fees you've paid exceeds the value of $95 per improved/deleted item, you'll get a refund of the difference. Do the math, because that's not a fantastic deal: at $29/month, eCreditAttorney would only have to make two improvements or deletions over the course of 6 months to demonstrate adequate "performance".
Even though it lacks some online information regarding its credit repair service options and does not provide services to a few states, CreditRepair.com's innovative technology and ability to remove negative items in a timely manner, combined with consumer repair reviews, allows members to receive faster, good credit results as well as evaluate their credit 24/7 with a peace of mind. 
You have the right to dispute any information in your credit report that's inaccurate, incomplete, or you believe can't be verified. When you order your credit report, you'll receive instructions on how to dispute credit report information. Credit reports ordered online typically come with instructions for making disputes online, but you can also make disputes over the phone and through the mail.
"In MY experience (of course you decide for yourself), the company is great and responsive for erroneous things that really should come off and that can be taken care of in the first month with the first set of challenges. I made the mistake of letting them convince me to keep on allowing them to challenge and re-challenge the same issues, with no progress made and considerable expenditure on my part. Be aware of the other ramifications of having these "challenges" on your record that they don’t tell you about. Good luck!"
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
×