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They may be willing to waive some of the late penalties or spread the past due balance over few payments. Let them know you're anxious to avoid charge-off, but need some help. Your creditor may even be willing to re-age your account to show your payments as current rather than delinquent, but you'll have to actually talk to your creditors to negotiate.
"I originally called just to get information, which I did receive plenty of. However, after speaking with a professional my mind was blown on what can, and should be done, and how creditors just don’t do what they are suppose to. So I immediately hired CreditRepair.com for credit repair services and in just a month they increased my score drastically. We still have a long way to go but I’m confident that it’ll get it resolved the rest of the way."
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Before web-based credit repair software was introduced into the world of technology, credit repair software was downloaded through deliverable disks which were then loaded onto the computer. Many complications and setbacks arose while using the downloadable credit repair software method including its slow extinction in the technical world which made it next to impossible to be updated and kept secure. All of these issues were eliminated when the advancement took place to create a secure and efficient web-based credit repair software program known as SAAS (Software as a service

Brittney Mayer is a credit strategist and contributing editor for BadCredit.org, where she uses her extensive research background to write comprehensive consumer guides aimed at helping readers make educated financial decisions on the path to building better credit. Leveraging her vast knowledge of the financial industry, Brittney’s work can be found on a variety of websites, including the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, US News & World Report, NBC News,TheSimpleDollar.com, CreditRepair.com, Lexington Law, CardRates.com, and CreditCards.com, among others.

The honest answer? Yes, and no. Credit repair is a great way to improve your credit score, if the problem is caused by a disputable error. If your credit score is poor because of a giant pile of debt — debt that you legitimately owe — then credit repair may not be the right solution. Determining which path to take will be based upon those considerations as well as any other factors that may be unique to your situation — and this is something only you can decide.
Either way, you should always remove any errors or outdated information from your credit report — regardless of the actual effect on your score — as soon as you discover them. A clean credit report can give you peace of mind the next time you apply for a loan; you’ll know that an inaccurate credit score isn’t holding you back from qualifying for a better interest rate, saving you time and money in the long run.
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