Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
How much you spend on credit repair depends on how involved you want to be in the process. If you hire a credit repair company, expect to pay a setup fee of up to $100 and monthly service fees of up to $150 for as long as six months. If you invest the time to repair your credit on your own, the credit repair process is free. Credit repair software that costs between $30 and $400 can help you draft letters to creditors and credit bureaus.
"I must say we are pleased thus far with the work that your company is doing in our behalf. I’ll admit that initially I was very skeptical about using your company. But you are proving me wrong in a very good way. Can’t wait to see the end results. Having many folks on the sideline looking to see what happens next with us. Thank you for your hard work!"

Pyramid did not blow us away with the description of their services. Who do they contact to submit disputes? How quickly do they follow up? Which types of circumstances do they help with? Most of their competitors offer lengthy lists of exactly which types of disputes they draft and what to expect from the service; Pyramid's answers were vague at best.
Before the innovation and release of credit repair business software such as TurboDispute, credit repair businesses were helpless when it came to finding a manageable and efficient way to perform simple credit repair tasks. Updating client files and reviewing dispute letters were a time-consuming task that has now been easily organized using credit repair software. By investing in credit repair business software, credit repair businesses can extremely improve their functionality and efficiency all while saving time and increasing their clientele.
"To be 100% honest, right now I feel like I'm on the bottom of the totem pole. After talking with CreditRepair.com I feel so much better. Anybody could do this stuff but when you're working as much as I am, you don't have the time to do it, and it's just peace of mind throughout the day to know you are helping me and that eventually I'm going to overcome by bad credit situation."
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The honest answer? Yes, and no. Credit repair is a great way to improve your credit score, if the problem is caused by a disputable error. If your credit score is poor because of a giant pile of debt — debt that you legitimately owe — then credit repair may not be the right solution. Determining which path to take will be based upon those considerations as well as any other factors that may be unique to your situation — and this is something only you can decide.
Opening several credit accounts in a short amount of time can appear risky to lenders and negatively impact your credit score. Before you take out a loan or open a new credit card account, consider the effects it could have on your credit scores. Know too, that when you're buying a car or looking around for the best mortgage rates, your inquiries may be grouped and counted as only one inquiry for the purpose of adding information to your credit report. In many commonly-used scoring models, recent inquiries have greater effect than older inquiries, and they only appear on your credit report or a maximum of 25 months.
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