"My credit had been bad for a while because of bad decisions. I just came to the point where I said this can be better. I heard your radio commercial and your customer service walked me through the whole process and explained and answered all my questions. I am very thank you for you helping me raise my scores to a respectful. It’s been such a journey. Thank you"
The honest answer? Yes, and no. Credit repair is a great way to improve your credit score, if the problem is caused by a disputable error. If your credit score is poor because of a giant pile of debt — debt that you legitimately owe — then credit repair may not be the right solution. Determining which path to take will be based upon those considerations as well as any other factors that may be unique to your situation — and this is something only you can decide.

If you are thinking of starting your own credit repair business, there are many factors to take into consideration before joining the growing industry of credit repair. With the economy rates as low as they are, the need for credit repair advisors and credit repair businesses are growing quickly. Begin by first researching all of the numerous state and federal laws in accordance to starting a credit repair business. Become acquainted with the CROA (Credit Repair Organizations Act), as well as your state’s legislation, licensing and bonding laws regarding credit repair business operation. Finally, educate yourself on all credit related topics that will help you succeed in the credit repair industry.
The Veracity site advertises that they're accredited by the Better Business Bureau. That may have been true in the past, but at the time of our review, this credit repair service was not accredited and actually had an "F" grade. Why? Company owners Daryl F. and Wendy M. Yurek were found guilty of tax evasion and bankruptcy fraud in 2017 and sentenced to serve time in jail.
If you find information that is incorrect, you can file a dispute. Remember too, that items on your credit report that you don't recognize could also be potential signs of fraudulent activity — someone working to secure credit in your name for their own use. Make sure you're clear on items that could potentially be fraudulent, versus those that may simply be inaccurate.
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