When considering the fees, it’s important to weigh what you’re getting in return. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), credit repair firms can’t legally do anything for you that you can’t do for yourself. You just have to be willing to spend the time reviewing your credit reports for negative or inaccurate information, reaching out to the credit bureaus to dispute that information, and following up on those disputes to make sure they’re being investigated.
Once you have your credit reports, read through them completely. If you have a long credit history, your credit reports might be several pages long. Try not to get overwhelmed by all the information you're reading. It's a lot to digest, especially if you're checking your credit report for the first time. Take your time and review your credit report over several days if you need to.
When considering the fees, it’s important to weigh what you’re getting in return. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), credit repair firms can’t legally do anything for you that you can’t do for yourself. You just have to be willing to spend the time reviewing your credit reports for negative or inaccurate information, reaching out to the credit bureaus to dispute that information, and following up on those disputes to make sure they’re being investigated.
“A good credit repair company will scrub questionable credit report items against other laws—like the Fair Credit Billing Act, which regulates original creditors; the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, which oversees collection agencies; and others that address medical illness, military service, student status and other life events,” Padawer said.

Amber Brooks is a Contributing Editor at Digital Brands. She spends her days consulting with financial experts to bring readers the best recommendations and tips on the web. She's interviewed financial leaders from all around the world. With a background in writing, she's uniquely suited to diluting complex financial jargon into terms that are easily understood. When not obsessively budgeting out her days, Amber can often be found with her nose in a book.
Credit repair is critical to saving money on insurance, loans, and credit cards, but that's not the only reason to repair your credit. A better credit score opens up new employment opportunities, even promotions and raises with your current employer. If you dream of starting your own business or just want the security of knowing you can borrow money when you want to, you should repair your credit sooner rather than later.
"My credit score was 553 (poor) in September 2013. I had given up. I decided to try CreditRepair.com after hearing about it on the radio. The service is so awesome; the App is awesome. They began to systematically remove negative items from my credit report and challenge others. By December 2013 my credit score had risen over 100 points to 655 (good). I am so psyched about this and can’t wait to see what my score looks like over the next two to three months. I’m telling everyone about CreditRepair.com."
With the customer Activity Feed feature you and your staff can post updates or notes on the work performed which will show chronological notes, comments or to do for that customer. Also, separate appointment calendar system, you can track your tasks and to do’s with ease. The user task management feature gives you and your employees the ability to delegate tasks.
Many credit repair leads fall flat when too much time is invested trying to acquire the client. Through the ability to digitally sign credit repair agreements, your company can keep a stronger hold on your potential client’s attention. Advanced setting management: TurboDispute software provides separate settings to control different aspects of your business. You have dashboards for Customer Management, Referral Management, Affiliate Management, Account Management and Dispute Letter Management as well as Software Customization.
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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