When the bureaus and data furnishers receive the dispute and supporting information, they then work with the credit repair company to determine if the item should be removed from your credit report. The major law governing your rights when it comes to credit reporting is the Fair Credit Reporting Act, but it isn’t the only law on your side when it comes to credit repair.
"I worked with a different credit repair provider approximately 10 years ago. The experience then compared to my experience now with CreditRepair.com is completely different. I am a "skeptic" and do not trust credit repair businesses easily. The representatives are professional (always) and I have the opportunity to get text and email updates on every transaction that is performed on my behalf to improve my credit score. There is nothing I can think of that is not already being done that could improve the service."
Credit Assistance Network is one of the few credit repair providers that offers a pay-as-you-go pricing structure. You'll make an initial payment of $179 (or $279 for a couple), which gets you access to one -on-one consultations with a certified FICO professional, debt validation/goodwill letters to creditors, cease and desist letters to collection agencies, and unlimited disputes. From there, you'll be charged for every deletion CAN is able to achieve on your account - $50 for confirmed deletions per bureau, and $70 for deletions from public records. That could add up very quickly, if you have multiple issues on your credit history.

Though numerous companies claim they can clean up bad credit reports, correcting erroneous information that may appear on credit reports takes time and effort. The details cited to credit reporting agencies cannot be removed by a third party. Rather the details, if misrepresented or inaccurate, can be disputed. Credit repair companies may investigate such information, but so can the individual the report is assessing. Individuals are entitled to free credit reports every 12 months from credit reporting agencies, as well as when an adverse action is taken against them, such as being denied credit based on information in the report.

Of course, if keeping accounts open and having credit available could trigger additional spending and debt, it might be more beneficial to close the accounts. Only you know all the ins and outs of your financial situation, and like thumbprints, they're different for each person. Make sure you carefully evaluate your situation; only you know what can work best for your financial outlook.
×