For the most part, Credit Saint's reputation is good: accreditation and an "A+" rating with the Better Business Bureau is strong evidence that they're helping people repair their credit in a way that is trustworthy and effective. There are also almost no negative reviews registered at the BBB for this company, which is impressive for a business that has been around for over 14 years. We found a few reviews that expressed frustration with Credit Saint's higher-than-average fees for credit repair services, but the company is very transparent with what you'll pay. We would like to see a clearer explanation of all of their services, particularly the "dispute avalanche".
In an industry like credit repair, reputation is everything when choosing which service to use. In that regard, Pyramid comes up short. To find out their track record with the BBB, we had to find them under their alternate business name, Credit Concierge Services LLC. The BBB lists that business as "NR" (No Rating) status until more data comes in; when we found that listing, there was only one review posted and it was negative. We found just over four dozen mostly-positive reviews specifically for Pyramid around the web, but in an age where we know that customer reviews can be faked (unlike what you find on TopConsumerReviews.com!), it's hard to know which ones are truthful without trusted validation like the BBB.
In an industry like credit repair, reputation is everything when choosing which service to use. In that regard, Pyramid comes up short. To find out their track record with the BBB, we had to find them under their alternate business name, Credit Concierge Services LLC. The BBB lists that business as "NR" (No Rating) status until more data comes in; when we found that listing, there was only one review posted and it was negative. We found just over four dozen mostly-positive reviews specifically for Pyramid around the web, but in an age where we know that customer reviews can be faked (unlike what you find on TopConsumerReviews.com!), it's hard to know which ones are truthful without trusted validation like the BBB.

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"At first I was amazed with seeing how many items were being removed from my credit report, but at the same time I noticed CreditRepair.com was showing one score, but when it was time to pull my report and score again, they didn't even come close to what credit repair was showing. That was very frustrating to me. I joined November 2013 until July 2014, and sacrificed the $89 a month. I was with the program 8 months. I possibly would join again."
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With the elimination of downloadable credit repair software, companies found themselves with an old program in a new age world. Most credit repair software programs were made to facilitate 32-bit computers, which have now become a thing of the past. Having updated computer systems are a must when it comes to operating a successfully growing credit repair businesses, and outdated software will only inhibit and restrain your advancement.
“A good credit repair company will scrub questionable credit report items against other laws—like the Fair Credit Billing Act, which regulates original creditors; the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, which oversees collection agencies; and others that address medical illness, military service, student status and other life events,” Padawer said.
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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