"Since I reached adult hood my credit has been poor due to having a serious medical condition and being raised in a struggling family without proper medical insurance. Even though I've worked hard my whole life I could never get a handle on my credit situation and never had the opportunity to prove my credit worthiness. Desperate to have good credit I've been taken by scams promising to clean my credit up and after thousands of dollars I've seen no change. Reluctantly I allowed CreditRepair.com to help me with their promise to clean my credit up and they are doing just that! In just a couple months they've proven they stand by their word! My credit score has jumped from the very weak 400's to 620 and they're not done yet! Finally I can see the light at the end of the tunnel! Thank you, CreditRepair.com!"
How much you spend on credit repair depends on how involved you want to be in the process. If you hire a credit repair company, expect to pay a setup fee of up to $100 and monthly service fees of up to $150 for as long as six months. If you invest the time to repair your credit on your own, the credit repair process is free. Credit repair software that costs between $30 and $400 can help you draft letters to creditors and credit bureaus.

"I am proud to have CreditRepair.com working on my behalf. Every person I’ve talked to has been very helpful as well as courteous and goes the extra mile to answer any and every question or concern that I have. CreditRepair.com has done a 5 star job at training their associates and they do their job well. This makes me glad to have joined with you in helping me get my life back on track. THANK YOU AND BEAUTIFUL JOB!"


A credit repair company initiates credit challenges to bureaus when they notice errors in your credit reports. Credit report disputes involve challenging credit bureaus, drafting goodwill letters to remove late payments and contacting data furnishers to verify old debts. Credit repair specialists review the results and, if necessary, escalate the dispute process.
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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