After you download your credit reports, it takes several hours to review them for errors. Then, you must gather documentation and draft dispute letters, which could take up to a week or more if you aren’t already familiar with your records. Depending on the item and the reason it's in your credit history, this could involve writing a short letter or performing significant amounts of research.
Credit Repair Consultants also proudly proclaims that they offer a refund policy on your monthly fees. The catch? You have to be a customer for a full 12 months before you can request an evaluation of your account; if the service has successfully removed or improved your account, you may not get a refund at all. They will claim a credit of $60 for every deleted or improved item on your credit report, and then compare it to the fees you've paid. In other words, if you've paid for 12 months at nearly $60 and they've removed or improved 12 things on your credit report, you're not entitled to anything back.
To get the inaccurate marks off your credit history, you must request that the credit bureaus validate the information that you believe is inaccurate. Credit repair strategies also include sending cease-and-desist letters to debt collectors. Removing just a single negative item on your credit report can increase your credit score by more than 100 points.
"I love CreditRepair.com, I was advised in April 2014 to use them by my son and dad, and they have been much help so far. I am able to track all 3 bureaus and the activity that goes on. My score is not perfect just yet, but they have removed most of the hard inquiries, which raised my score 40 points in no time. Thank you CreditRepair.com. I definitely recommend to all my friends and who ever comes across this post."
Reducing your balances on credit cards and other revolving credit accounts is likely the better option to improve your credit utilization rate, and, subsequently, your credit scores. Consistently making on-time payments against your debt will also help you build a positive credit history, which can have additional benefits for your credit history and, by extension, your credit scores, too.
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