Amber Brooks is a Contributing Editor at Digital Brands. She spends her days consulting with financial experts to bring readers the best recommendations and tips on the web. She's interviewed financial leaders from all around the world. With a background in writing, she's uniquely suited to diluting complex financial jargon into terms that are easily understood. When not obsessively budgeting out her days, Amber can often be found with her nose in a book.
The Credit People offer a simple way to check out their services: pay an initial fee of $19, which includes your credit report (a service often not provided by credit repair services) and see what you think for the next 7 days. If you choose to continue using their credit repair plan, you'll pay a flat fee of $79 per month. The service can be cancelled at any time, and an "Unbeatable Satisfaction Guarantee" allows you to get a refund for one month's service fees (this is assuming you cancel as soon as you're unhappy, not months after the fact).
"I like that you are helping me to improve my credit, even though the price is a little high but it's worth doing it for my future. I just wish it would improve a little faster and also get rid or lower the interest rate on the federal loan, hopefully I can see a better score next month or so. I do plan on getting a new car some time next year or so depending on the status of my credit."
If you'd like to get a feel for what to expect from The Credit Pros, you can get a free credit score and summary, along with an action plan, by entering your name, number, and email address. You'll then be contacted for your free initial consultation. We found some customers who described that experience as frustrating, with representatives who spoke too fast and didn't take the time to answer questions - but since it's free, there's no risk for you to give it a try for yourself.
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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