Pyramid did not blow us away with the description of their services. Who do they contact to submit disputes? How quickly do they follow up? Which types of circumstances do they help with? Most of their competitors offer lengthy lists of exactly which types of disputes they draft and what to expect from the service; Pyramid's answers were vague at best.

"I must say that even though I had signed up with the service, at first there was slight skepticism as to whether or not they would provide the level of service promised. They have a believer out of me. In less than three months I have seen my credit score jump from 638 to 708. This is due to their dogged persistence in having negatives removed from my credit report. I initially decided that I would cancel my subscription in three months if I was not satisfied. I will recommend their service to any and everyone I know. THANK YOU CREDITREPAIR.COM!!!"
For the most part, Credit Saint's reputation is good: accreditation and an "A+" rating with the Better Business Bureau is strong evidence that they're helping people repair their credit in a way that is trustworthy and effective. There are also almost no negative reviews registered at the BBB for this company, which is impressive for a business that has been around for over 14 years. We found a few reviews that expressed frustration with Credit Saint's higher-than-average fees for credit repair services, but the company is very transparent with what you'll pay. We would like to see a clearer explanation of all of their services, particularly the "dispute avalanche".
It involves identifying questionable negative information on your credit reports and challenging the negative items in question. But, it can also require following up with the credit bureaus and to get the negative items from your credit reports removed. If you have been a victim of identity theft, it is highly likely that you have multiple accounts that need to be disputed.
The credit bureau usually has 30 days after receiving your dispute to investigate and verify information. Typically, the credit bureau will reach out to the company that provided the information and ask them to investigate. The credit bureau is required to send you the results of the investigation within five business days of the completion of the investigation.
Brittney Mayer is a credit strategist and contributing editor for BadCredit.org, where she uses her extensive research background to write comprehensive consumer guides aimed at helping readers make educated financial decisions on the path to building better credit. Leveraging her vast knowledge of the financial industry, Brittney’s work can be found on a variety of websites, including the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, US News & World Report, NBC News,TheSimpleDollar.com, CreditRepair.com, Lexington Law, CardRates.com, and CreditCards.com, among others.
Opening several credit accounts in a short amount of time can appear risky to lenders and negatively impact your credit score. Before you take out a loan or open a new credit card account, consider the effects it could have on your credit scores. Know too, that when you're buying a car or looking around for the best mortgage rates, your inquiries may be grouped and counted as only one inquiry for the purpose of adding information to your credit report. In many commonly-used scoring models, recent inquiries have greater effect than older inquiries, and they only appear on your credit report or a maximum of 25 months.
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