Credit repair is the process of disputing negative marks on credit reports to get them removed, which raises your credit score. Credit histories often contain inaccurate or invalid items that damage your score. If you check your credit and your score is lower than you anticipated, it could be because of incorrect information on your credit reports.

"I just want to say how great it is working with CreditRepair.com and how much hope you guys have given me. You have made great strides in just a few short months and I am sure to reach my goal before this year is over. Whenever I call, and I call a lot, you are never too busy to talk to me and I knew from the very first interview that you truly care about your customers. With all my heart I am truly grateful."
From there, Credit Repair's experts work with credit companies to implement your plan, and then they verify with the credit bureaus to make sure that those changes actually take effect. You can track your progress through your personal online dashboard and a mobile app, where you'll also see your score tracker and analysis of the changes to your credit profile.

The Credit Repair Organizations Act, or CROA, makes it illegal for credit repair companies to lie about their services and results, and sets some additional rules. If you think you might be the victim of a credit repair scam, or if you’ve had other issues with a credit repair company, you can submit a complaint to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
"I must say that even though I had signed up with the service, at first there was slight skepticism as to whether or not they would provide the level of service promised. They have a believer out of me. In less than three months I have seen my credit score jump from 638 to 708. This is due to their dogged persistence in having negatives removed from my credit report. I initially decided that I would cancel my subscription in three months if I was not satisfied. I will recommend their service to any and everyone I know. THANK YOU CREDITREPAIR.COM!!!"
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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