"CreditRepair.com is an exceptionally wonderful company for people with the desire to improve their credit. There are people who will work with you to answer any questions you may have and will work with you in your journey to improve your credit. Most importantly, they will intervene on your behalf to remove negative information from your credit report."
A good credit repair company first pulls your credit reports from each of the three major credit bureaus in order to pinpoint your credit issues. Why all three? Because each credit reporting agency has its own “data furnishers” (aka lenders, credit card companies, debt collectors, etc.), that report your credit information to them. And there may be errors that appear on one of your credit reports, but don’t appear on the others
In order to analyze credit files, identify credit reporting errors, and evaluate credit scoring, credit repair advisors must be highly trained and have some level of experience. To understand the credit scoring models and how they differ from each other, one can review the most popular credit scoring model, FICO. Known as Fair Isaac and Company, FICO can help you understand the complexities of credit scoring and the credit scoring process, including identifying potential inaccuracies, duplications, merged files, unverifiable data, and outdated data.

"Other than a simple misunderstanding with a recommendation to scoresense.com, my overall experience has been very good. This website helped my score immensely. Being a firefighter, I was embarrassed when trying to get a loan with such a poor credit score when it should have been much higher. Now I am much more confident when I walk into the bank for any reason. CreditRepair.com truly put credit monitoring and evaluation on my personal radar. Thank-you."
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
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