If you'd like to get a feel for what to expect from The Credit Pros, you can get a free credit score and summary, along with an action plan, by entering your name, number, and email address. You'll then be contacted for your free initial consultation. We found some customers who described that experience as frustrating, with representatives who spoke too fast and didn't take the time to answer questions - but since it's free, there's no risk for you to give it a try for yourself.
This provider offers a "performance-based refund policy": after you've been a client in good standing for 6 months, you can request a full evaluation of any progress they've made in repairing your credit. For every improvement or deletion they've made, eCreditAttorney will count it as a $95 value. If the total of monthly fees you've paid exceeds the value of $95 per improved/deleted item, you'll get a refund of the difference. Do the math, because that's not a fantastic deal: at $29/month, eCreditAttorney would only have to make two improvements or deletions over the course of 6 months to demonstrate adequate "performance".
"CreditRepair.com is an exceptionally wonderful company for people with the desire to improve their credit. There are people who will work with you to answer any questions you may have and will work with you in your journey to improve your credit. Most importantly, they will intervene on your behalf to remove negative information from your credit report."
Fixing your credit history can seem like a tall order, especially given the number of creditors and credit bureaus you might have to deal with to get your credit issues fully squared away. Fortunately, credit repair services make this process an easy one. Below is a summary of our trusted services, along with basic facts and ratings for each. To get a consultation for your credit situation, click the name of the repair service you prefer to visit its confidential online signup.
Credit scoring models usually take into account how much you owe compared to how much credit you have available, called your credit utilization rate or your balance-to-limit ratio. Basically it's the sum of all of your revolving debt (such as your credit card balances) divided by the total credit that is available to you (or the total of all your credit limits).
×